House and Senate Vote for Increase in FY08 Energy Bill Appropriations

Washington, DC (July 18, 2007)- The House passed the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill of 2008 (H.R. 2641, H. Rept. 110-85) on July 17 by a vote of 312-112. The House Bill appropriates $1.98 billion for Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) programs for FY 2008, $742 million (60%) more than the Administration’s FY 2008 request of $1.23 billion and $504 million more than FY 07 enacted. Congressionally directed activities were funded by the House at $104.3 million.


Ten amendments to H.R. 2641 were considered. Only one (H.Amdt.500) passed on a voice vote to eliminate an $0.5 million earmark. Rep. John Campbell (R-CA) offered an amendment (H.Amdt.509) to prohibit use of funds for each earmark listed in the bill. Rep. Campbell said, “This particular amendment would eliminate all the earmarks in the bill, all 800 of them, all $1.1 billion of them…. the fact is, Mr. Chairman, that the process by which these earmarks happen stinks. And I believe that this process is terrible and that until we reform this process, we should eliminate all earmarks.” The amendment failed 39-388.
The Senate Committee on Appropriations reported the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill of 2008 (S. 1751, S. Rept. 110-127) out of Committee on June 28. The Senate Bill appropriates $1.72 billion for Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) programs for FY 2008, $479 million (39%) more than the Administration’s FY 2008 request and $241 million more than FY 07 enacted. Congressionally directed activities were funded by the Senate Committee at $91.0 million.
According to the Senate report, for every dollar invested in energy efficiency R&D, the US economy receives about $20 in return through energy savings, new jobs, and new products. The Committee supports increases in efficiency programs above the President’s request. The report finds that the President’s goal of reducing gasoline usage by 20 percent in the next ten years, coupled with the increased biomass R&D budget, could significantly reduce the Nation’s “oil addiction.” In particular, lowering feedstock costs and ensuring sustainable supplies of biomass are necessary to greatly increase the amount of biofuels production in the United States. The Committee also believes that solar energy could provide hundreds of thousands of new, high-tech jobs throughout the United States and could reduce natural gas demand on the order of billions of cubic feet.
Related Resources:
House Appropriators Add Earmarks to Energy-Water Bill
ACT Energy Bill Resources
Congressional Quarterly
H.R. 2641 Appropriations Bill
H.R. 2337 Committee Bill
S. 1751 Senate Bill