Tree Canada Announces its First Carbon Protocol

Nanaimo, British Columbia (September 23, 2009)- Tree Canada released its Forest & Urban Tree Carbon Project Protocol, during the Annual General Meeting of the Canadian Institute of Forestry in Nanaimo B.C. today. The protocol describes how Tree Canada will account for the greenhouse gas offset value of trees. More individuals, companies and organizations are interested in tree projects as a way to offset their carbon emissions. A technical document, this protocol will answer their questions about third party verification and how it meets Kyoto Protocol standards of additionality, permanence and determining baseline scenarios.


It also provides examples of Tree Canada’s history in providing successful tree projects across Canada in urban and rural landscapes. The protocol was authored by expert associates of Tree Canada and peer reviewed by four recognized carbon experts across Canada.
“The carbon offset market is becoming more sophisticated and this protocol is a response to this evolution,” explained Michael Rosen, Tree Canada President. “This protocol explains how Tree Canada’s forestry projects can be used as a legitimate carbon offset option and furthers Tree Canada’s leadership role in the long term maintenance of our trees and forests.”
To read the protocol, please visit the website at www.treecanada.ca
About Tree Canada
Tree Canada is a not-for-profit charitable organization established to encourage Canadians to plant and care for trees in urban and rural environments. A winner of the Canadian Environmental Award (2007), Tree Canada engages Canadian companies, government agencies and individuals to support the planting of trees, the greening of schoolyards, and other efforts to sensitize Canadians to the benefits of planting and maintaining trees. To date, more than 76 million trees have been planted, more than 450 schoolyards have been greened, and Tree Canada has organized 8 national urban forest conferences. More information about Tree Canada is available at www.treecanada.ca.