Social Media Plays Greater Role in Cause Engagement for African American and Hispanics

By Julie Dixon
Washington, DC (May 31, 2011)- African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely than Caucasians to engage with and learn about social issues and causes through social media. Nearly one in three African American adults (30%) and four in ten Hispanics (39%) say they are more likely to support a cause or social issue online than offline today-both significantly higher percentages than Caucasians (24%), according to the new Dynamics of Cause Engagement study.


Jointly conducted in late 2010 by Georgetown University’s Center for Social Impact Communication and Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide, the study examined trends in cause involvement and the roles of a variety of activities in fostering engagement with social issues among American adults age 18 and over.
African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely to believe that they can help get the word out about a social issue or cause through online social networks (58% and 51%, respectively, vs. 34% of Caucasians). Both African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely than Caucasians to look to social media as an additional source of information (31% and 27% vs. 21%, respectively). While half of Caucasians and Hispanics (48% and 51%, respectively) agree that they get too many emails about causes now, a significantly lower number of African Americans (33%) feel this way.
African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely than Caucasians to believe that supporting causes makes them feel like a part of a community. African Americans and Hispanics are significantly more likely than Caucasians to be involved in several key issues, including diabetes, domestic violence, bullying, childhood obesity, Haiti relief and HIV/AIDS.
Related Resource:
Social Media Plays Greater Role in Cause Engagement for African Americans and Hispanics