The Green $$ in Going Green

Washington, DC (February 9, 2008)- The interest in green design and smart growth is growing as more folks recognize the energy and cost savings associated with green building and living in smart growth communities. As this interest grows, the potential market by “going green” also increases.


This session will provide a macro to micro look at the burgeoning green market. We will discuss how to take brownfields and infill to green communities; how these projects can be sold as contributors to climate change strategies; and how we can build market acceptance by addressing factors such as building codes and stormwater regulations, lending and insurance standards, and incentives that might help overcome the perceived “green premium.”
From the broad macro look, we will bring the session down to how individuals can save money and entrepreneurs make money by embracing green design and smart growth. The session will feature experts dealing with market barriers to green building and green financing; consultants who make their livelihood by guiding green, smart growth development, and retailers who feature green building supplies and household goods.
Speakers:
Noreen Beatley, Sustainable Communities Consultant
Evans Paull, Senior Policy Analyst, Northeast Midwest Institute
Jim Vanderkloot, Land Revitalization Coordinator, U.S. EPA Region, 5
Jason Holstine, Founder & President, Amicus Green Building Center
Andrew Grigsby, Principal, Commonwealth Sustainability Works
About New Partners for Smart Growth
The 2008 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference in Washington, DC, hosted attendance of more than 1300 people from across the country for three full days of presentations, discussions, and information sharing. The conference was produced by the Local Government Commission (LGC), with support from a very impressive and multi-disciplinary group of partners and sponsoring organizations, agencies and companies.
Related Resources:
7th Annual New Partners for Smart Growth: Building Safe, Healthy, and Livable Communities